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Yates to the Rev. John Dixon, Jan 11, 1774

Fredsburg, Jany. 11th 1774

Revd. Mr Jno. Dixon
Sir
The Negro Man named Harry that I bought at the sale you had here, inform'd me on his return from Culpeper, he has been distempered for Fourteen Years past & is now incapable of doing any hard Labour--this he also told me was well known to all the Family he belonged to and that his saying other ways at the sale was owing to the dread of punishment if he shoud confess the truth--however not to depend solely on what the Fellow said - I sent to Mr Clayton desiring him to walk up to my House that he might hear what the Negro declared & this before I had put him to work - Mr Clayton agreed to the truth of the Fellows account, except that he thought he sometimes made more of the matter than there was occasion for and owned also that he had been long under the hands of Negro Doctor and had since he knew him generally lost a great deal of time by having laid up when the weather was in extremes or he put to other labour than plowing or driving the cart - Now sir as you must believe under these circumstances I woud not have given half the sum I passed Bond for, and as I can prove at the [illeg.] he was selling, I asked & was told he was a sound healthy slave I hope you will give order for some person here to receive him of me and return my obligation - otherways I must defend myself from payment as well as I can, and have no doubt of being by that means acquitted of the bargain, Mr Clayton has said he will write you on the subject, from what he may say I presume you will be better able to give answer to this -- and I expect favourably - in the mean time the slave shall be taken good care of by Sir
Your obed hble servt.
Chs Yates

Bibliographic Information

[Charles Yates Letterbook, p. 44. 1773-1783 The Harrison Institute and Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia #3807 (micro M 570-P)]

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