History 604

University of Virginia
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Civil Rights in U.S. and Virginia History

Instructor:
William G. Thomas

Danville, Va.1963The course begins with segregation, traces its legal and social origins, and covers the development of the NAACP's legal strategy to destroy segregation, the impact of World War II on the civil rights movement, the political organization of Harry F. Byrd in Virginia, how the Byrd organization policies abetted segregation, and massive resistance in Virginia to the Brown v. Board of Education decision. The course also treats these subjects in the context of the Civil Rights Movement as a whole in United States history. We will examine the local perspective on these national and state events through the eyes of participants and the course focuses on understanding the relationship between national and local events in history.

From the Danville Corporation Court 1963, Courtesy of The Library of Virginia

 

About the Course

The goal of this class is to offer a seminar experience in the study of the American Civil Rights movement through distance learning technology. Seminars depend on student-faculty collaboration and interaction and often on small group settings that encourage thoughtful reflection and reasoned discussion. This course aims to provide students with these aspects of a seminar using technologies already well established in Virginia schools. The course is open to all K-12 teachers in Virginia. Students are expected to have basic competence with using a web browser for accessing the Internet.

This course examines the civil rights movement in U.S. and Virginia history from the origins of segregation to the 1970s. The course begins with segregation, traces its legal and social origins, and covers the development of the NAACP's legal strategy to destroy segregation, the impact of World War II on the civil rights movement, the political organization of Harry F. Byrd in Virginia, how the Byrd organization policies abetted segregation, and massive resistance in Virginia to the Brown v. Board of Education decision. The course also treats these subjects in the context of the Civil Rights Movement as a whole in United States history. The course examines the local perspective on these national and state events through the eyes of participants and the course focuses on understanding the relationship between national and local events in history. The course directly addresses the Standards of Learning in History for educators and teaching strategies for them.

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